MIDI drawings

Inspired by Andrew Huang and his MIDI unicorn, I make midi compositions that forms a picture. It’s called a MIDI drawing, and it’s entirely stupid, but incredibly fun to make. — by Mari Lesteberg

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Manifesto for making music

  1. The use of sounds that exist already is not allowed. Subject to article 2. In particular:
    • No drum machines.
    • No synthesizers.
    • No presets.
  2. Only sounds that are generated at the start of the compositional process or taken from the artist’s own previously unused archive are available for sampling.
  3. The sampling of other people’s music is strictly forbidden.
  4. No replication of traditional acoustic instruments is allowed where the financial and physical possibility of using the real ones exists.
  5. The inclusion, development, propagation, existence, replication, acknowledgement, rights, patterns and beauty of what are commonly known as accidents, is encouraged. Furthermore, they have equal rights within the composition as deliberate, conscious, or premeditated compositional actions or decisions.
  6. The mixing desk is not to be reset before the start of a new track in order to apply a random eq and fx setting across the new sounds. Once the ordering and recording of new music has begun, the desk may be used as normal.
  7. All fx settings must be edited: no factory preset or pre-programmed patches are allowed.
  8. Samples themselves are not to be truncated from the rear. Revealing parts of the recording are invariably stored there.
  9. A notation of sounds used to be taken and made public.
  10. A list of technical equipment used to be made public.
  11. Optional: Remixes should be completed using only the sounds provided by the original artist.

Matthew Herbert (2005)

James Baldwin

The artist is distinguished from all other responsible actors in society — the politicians, legislators, educators, and scientists — by the fact that he is his own test tube, his own laboratory, working according to very rigorous rules, however unstated these may be, and cannot allow any consideration to supersede his responsibility to reveal all that he can possibly discover concerning the mystery of the human being. Society must accept some things as real; but he must always know that visible reality hides a deeper one, and that all our action and achievement rest on things unseen. A society must assume that it is stable, but the artist must know, and he must let us know, that there is nothing stable under heaven. One cannot possibly build a school, teach a child, or drive a car without taking some things for granted. The artist cannot and must not take anything for granted, but must drive to the heart of every answer and expose the question the answer hides. — James Baldwin