Arte e progresso

El arte no es progreso y esa es su virtud. El progreso se mide por alcances económicos, sociales y políticos, es un avance que proyecta poder, elimina al pasado e invade el futuro. El ritmo del progreso es frenético, devastador, erige su propio altar para adorarse. El arte utiliza el tiempo en un gesto, una palabra, un color, en contemplación o en nada. La presión que el arte sufre para ser “actual y con las preocupaciones de nuestro tiempo” ha desvirtuado su trayecto, lo conduce a los objetivos redituables del progreso. El arte es y debe ser antiproductivo, antiprogresista y antiactual. — Avelina Lésper

Ambient

It’s interesting what part of ambient they took as being the center of it. For me, the central idea was about music as a place you go to. Not a narrative, not a sequence that has some sort of teleological direction to it—verse, chorus, this, that, and the other. It’s really based on abstract expressionism: Instead of the picture being a structured perspective, where your eye is expected to go in certain directions, it’s a field, and you wander sonically over the field. And it’s a field that is deliberately devoid of personalities, because if there’s a personality there, that’s who you’ll follow. So there’s not somebody in that field leading you around; you find your own way.
Brian Eno on Pitchfork interview

Brian Eno

I really think that for us, who all grew up listening primarily to recorded music, we tend to forget that until about 120 years ago ephemeral experience was the only one people had. I remember reading about a huge fan of Beethoven who lived to the age of 86 [in the era before recordings], and the great triumph of his life was that he’d managed to hear the Fifth Symphony six times. That’s pretty amazing. They would have been spread over many years, so there would have been no way of reliably comparing those performances. — Brian Eno

Manifesto for making music

  1. The use of sounds that exist already is not allowed. Subject to article 2. In particular:
    • No drum machines.
    • No synthesizers.
    • No presets.
  2. Only sounds that are generated at the start of the compositional process or taken from the artist’s own previously unused archive are available for sampling.
  3. The sampling of other people’s music is strictly forbidden.
  4. No replication of traditional acoustic instruments is allowed where the financial and physical possibility of using the real ones exists.
  5. The inclusion, development, propagation, existence, replication, acknowledgement, rights, patterns and beauty of what are commonly known as accidents, is encouraged. Furthermore, they have equal rights within the composition as deliberate, conscious, or premeditated compositional actions or decisions.
  6. The mixing desk is not to be reset before the start of a new track in order to apply a random eq and fx setting across the new sounds. Once the ordering and recording of new music has begun, the desk may be used as normal.
  7. All fx settings must be edited: no factory preset or pre-programmed patches are allowed.
  8. Samples themselves are not to be truncated from the rear. Revealing parts of the recording are invariably stored there.
  9. A notation of sounds used to be taken and made public.
  10. A list of technical equipment used to be made public.
  11. Optional: Remixes should be completed using only the sounds provided by the original artist.

Matthew Herbert (2005)

James Baldwin

The artist is distinguished from all other responsible actors in society — the politicians, legislators, educators, and scientists — by the fact that he is his own test tube, his own laboratory, working according to very rigorous rules, however unstated these may be, and cannot allow any consideration to supersede his responsibility to reveal all that he can possibly discover concerning the mystery of the human being. Society must accept some things as real; but he must always know that visible reality hides a deeper one, and that all our action and achievement rest on things unseen. A society must assume that it is stable, but the artist must know, and he must let us know, that there is nothing stable under heaven. One cannot possibly build a school, teach a child, or drive a car without taking some things for granted. The artist cannot and must not take anything for granted, but must drive to the heart of every answer and expose the question the answer hides. — James Baldwin

Brian Eno

I’ve always thought that art is a lie, an interesting lie. And I´ll sort of listen to the ‘lie’ and try to imagine the world which makes that lie true… what that world must be like, and what would have to happen for us to get from this world to that one. — Brian Eno