Ambient

It’s interesting what part of ambient they took as being the center of it. For me, the central idea was about music as a place you go to. Not a narrative, not a sequence that has some sort of teleological direction to it—verse, chorus, this, that, and the other. It’s really based on abstract expressionism: Instead of the picture being a structured perspective, where your eye is expected to go in certain directions, it’s a field, and you wander sonically over the field. And it’s a field that is deliberately devoid of personalities, because if there’s a personality there, that’s who you’ll follow. So there’s not somebody in that field leading you around; you find your own way.
Brian Eno on Pitchfork interview

Luca Tombolini

Luca Tombolini

In my photography I’m following a fascination for desert primordial places. No other places are so helpful in making that mind shift needed to try to enquire beyond our limited lifetime. This process implies contemplation, the Self, the Unconscious and the perceived reality. I’ve found photography particularly efficient to make considerations about time, either when it’s clearly stopping it or on the contrary when it gives the impression of compressing time as if the moment pictured could have existed forever. The latter was the impression i had when i first developed the shots of the early landscapes series i did. — Luca Tombolini

Seascapes

Hiroshi Sugimoto

Seascapes is a project by Hiroshi Sugimoto.

Water and air. So very commonplace are these substances, they hardly attract attention―and yet they vouchsafe our very existence. The beginnings of life are shrouded in myth: Let there water and air. Living phenomena spontaneously generated from water and air in the presence of light, though that could just as easily suggest random coincidence as a Deity. Let’s just say that there happened to be a planet with water and air in our solar system, and moreover at precisely the right distance from the sun for the temperatures required to coax forth life. While hardly inconceivable that at least one such planet should exist in the vast reaches of universe, we search in vain for another similar example. Mystery of mysteries, water and air are right there before us in the sea. Every time I view the sea, I feel a calming sense of security, as if visiting my ancestral home; I embark on a voyage of seeing. — Hiroshi Sugimoto